Calcott Hall, Domgay, Powys

Calcott Hall first came on to the exploring radar shortly after it was introduced to the Buildings at Risk register by Powys council. There may have been a few who explored it before then, but the influx came in around 2012/2013 – and inevitably made its way in the national newspapers with lashings of “spooky” and “eerie” plastered on over-edited, HDR shots of the “Red Dress Manor”.

Calcott Hall, Wales
The impressive exterior of Calcott Hall

Having completely missed the bus on this one we thought it’d be rude not to pop in and have a look whilst in the area. The locals seem pretty jumpy and wary of anyone driving through the village. We only stopped for two minutes and already had people ask us what we were looking for! They must get it all the time.

Walking up to Calcott Hall, (grade II listed in 1953) the grandeur of this early 18th century building turns to pity as it looks as though it’s ready to give up and fall down. Built circa 1725, the Georgian-style farmhouse is in a sorry way and you can see why it was put on the buildings at risk register. Every window is broken and frames rotten. Roof tiles are missing and inside many rooms have extremely dangerous floors, and no floor at all in places. But it’s this dereliction that gives Calcott Hall its beauty.

Although almost every room looks like it’s been rearranged to create the perfect photograph, the contents of Calcott Hall are fascinating. A home which was reportedly abandoned in the ’70s after the owner fell ill has personal paperwork and photographs strewn over the floors and worktops. A pantry full of food, all obviously out of date.

As you move to the upper floors, to the bedroom which gave Calcott Hall the codename of “Red Dress Manor”, it no longer sports a red dress – apparently taken a few months ago – a nightie now drapes over the wardrobe next to a bed which still has bedsheets on. Why anyone would want to take the dress is beyond me? Perhaps it was someone annoyed at the code-naming, or perhaps a caretaker who thought it might deter explorers?

Moving down to the basement there’s more interesting items. Some lovely wooden barrels and a few bits of equipment which hint to Calcott Hall’s farming history. After making sure we had explored every room (it’s a bit of a “higgledy-piggledy” layout in there!) we packed up and made our way outside to photograph the exterior – but not before bumping in to another couple of explorers disembarking the tour bus!

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46 responses to “Calcott Hall, Domgay, Powys”

  1. Dan says:

    I found a similar place near where I live called Clawdd Farm. It is definitely worth checking out and isn’t too much hassle to get to the building. I have a gallery uploaded on my site and a link to the location on Google maps; http://djcphotography.net/abandoned-buildings-near-me-clawdd-farm/

  2. I visited this location last year to capture some photographs. I never break in to a place and only enter if suitable. I never move, take or even touch anything. I thoroughly enjoy photographing these places as it is the easiest way to travel back in time. Although my presence was not welcomed by a nearby neighbour who threatened me with a visit from the police, I’m 100% satisfied with my visit as I came across an abandoned cow that was clearly malnourished which I reported to the RSPCA. So to the people that think the photographers trash these places, real urban explorers never damage the property, only document the past and can sometimes even save animals! :)

    • craig says:

      Hi there how’s things I’ve been looking this Calcott Hall, I cant seem to find a location at all…

      We are wanting to travel out this weekend to get some footage of the place would there be a chance of me getting the location from you please. I understand people don’t like to hand over locations but we do this as a hobby and not to wreck the places.

      Many thanks
      Craig

  3. karen Williams says:

    Karen
    Unfortunately its because of blogs like this one that these stunning placed get trashed. Look how many are asking to go visit – the more people that go to these places the more they draw the attention of vandals – sometimes just looking at the stunning images is enough, but the don’t touch rule wont apply to most who go and someone will always want a ‘souvenir’ of the occasion. Shame.

  4. Liam says:

    Hi, I know this is just a house, but is there any security around? Me and a friend really want to start doing urban exploration.

  5. John michaud says:

    Came across this site and the pics of the house by accident. Someone clearly took things from the house because two years ago I bought a ration book on eBay that was listed to a Mr Morris at Calcott Hall in Powys. The ration book was from 1943 and was in great shape and complete. I gave it to an English friend and am trying to find out if he still has it. Very strange – I feel I should return it. Sad to think that it’s now been trashed.

  6. Adam says:

    I’ve been back to this place twice now. It is a stunning building.
    My first time there the place looked pretty much as you recorded, second time, a year later (very recent) it has been trashed. This is such a shame – why would anyone want to do that, what is the point! The whole building though has a “pleasant” feel about it, it must have been a very happy home once upon a time.
    Hats off to you and those urban explorers who take time out to record times gone by leaving no trace behind of their visit but for a snapshot into something that once was.
    I think there should be some kind of trespass exemption for urban explorers as they are providing a valuable resource on the history of this country!

  7. BigDave says:

    This was one hell of a place to see, unfortunately its been stripped and there isn’t much there now. so I’m told the farmer got fed up of all the attention it was getting.

  8. Darrel says:

    Hi,
    I want to know is it illegal to go explore this building, me and a mate really want to go have a look around as it sounds and looks really good, been playing on our minds for a few weeks now

    • The Urban Explorer says:

      Hi Darrel. I’d recommend you read the law regarding trespass in England & Wales and then make your own judgement. If you need any more information feel free to contact me

      • Tracy says:

        Hi I have been doin a little urban exploring the last year with my fiance, and have been to Camelot. Denbigh Asylum. And also to St. Joseph’s college full of CCTV and also have security on location and Winstanley Hall. But unfortunately we was unable to gain access to the last two locations. Our next stop is to Mid Wales Asylum. But I have been wanting to go to this red dess manor for some time. I am unable to find a location for this as the only ones that show on google earth are both being used and don’t look like the pictures and one was down south. Do you possibly have a postcode for this location as it’s been on my list of places for a while now.

  9. Rhian says:

    My parents live a few hundred metres from Calcott Hall. In fact they bought the land their house is built on from the farmer it belongs to, who is – I believe – at the time of writing still alive although in a home. My grandparents played cards with the owners in the (now collapsed) widows walk, and my parents used to visit the owner regularly until a few years ago. There was so much complete nonsense written about it, I feel moved to remind people that it was someone’s home, although in poor repair, until really quite recently.

    • Kathy says:

      Hi Rhian, I am related to the owners from my Grandmothers side, I am 70 next year and lost touch many years ago. I was told they had died. I live a long way from there. But would like to know they are ok, please.

  10. Fascinating! I’ve just come across your blog due to its photography (UK Blog Awards) (which is fab by the way) so I never actually heard that there are abandoned places that you can just go and visit! I’m a big fan of interiors so this manor is so interesting to see – it’s as if it’s been plucked out of a horror book and as if time hasn’t touched it – absolutely fascinating.

  11. Amy H says:

    Took a Christmas Eve photo trip up to this place yesterday, struggled to get inside as someone had dumped a rather huge pile of cow dung by the open window which I fell through! So I was defeated but enjoyed taking some snaps in the garage of the old Morris Marina – anybody fancy revisiting this place when the poo is summer-firm? I’d very much like to shoot some footage inside!

  12. amy says:

    I’ve been looking around for places like this for years. After I found a strange interest in it at 13… Often the ones found near canals are better for easy access. Sadly my favourite place has just been flattened! Seems to be a lot more security on these places now! Any unspoken places you could link me to? I’ve broken my leg in three places trying to get into places like this so the access doesn’t matter! (I managed to get away far enough to say I did it falling though). Email me if you can think of any!

  13. I am Raymond from Hong Kong. I am a freelance photographer using film mostly. I am planning a 2-week trip to UK. I was wondering if anyone interested having a abandoned place tour around? Please let me know. Thank you!

    Instagram: @raywychin
    Email: raywychin@hotmail.com

  14. allen mcnally says:

    It’s a fantastic time capsule, just hope no one destroys it.

  15. Niamh Wilson says:

    This looks an amazing place to explore! Just wondering how to get in to the building itself, is it regularly easy?

  16. B Teague says:

    Very interesting place and would love to know more about it, like how she passed away, who else lived there. One thing does not ring true though, if she passed away in the 70s and nobody else lived there how come the car was last taxed in 1985?

  17. lucy collingwood says:

    I was wondering if you could email me the address or postcode to this site as I am studying photography for my A Levels and will be doing it at university and I have been looking at this site but I can’t seem to find it and I have looked up the village but I cant find that building.

    Could you help me?

  18. kayleigh says:

    How do I get to this place?
    I would love to visit, I visited Baron Hill Mansion, Beaumaris.
    This place was fascinating, but no remains of life and very over grown.

    The remains of life here are fascinating, I hope to God nothing else gets stolen, like the iconic dress.

    What a fantastic piece of history.

  19. Another Explorer says:

    I love ghost towns and abandoned places as each of them have a story left behind and it’s amazing to explore it. Yesterday I went to a Ghost Town Skrunda 1, in Latvia. The only sad thing was that people stole many things there so I didn’t get to see a lot however it was interesting to see old hospitals, jails, schools and homes.

    Thanks for creating this website, I might visit some abandoned places when I come back to UK!

  20. Anon says:

    Great post. Got any new explores planned soon?

  21. Loopster says:

    Went here yesterday and got some great photos. Very strange moment when I realised my mother is in that school photograph. Utter goosebumps.

  22. Dean says:

    That car has not been taxed since the 1st of june 1985

  23. Clare says:

    Hey I’m doing a photography project on abandoned houses and I was just wondering – is this house open for anyone to come in and photograph?

    • The Urban Explorer says:

      Yes, but in the same way that every location on this website is “open for anyone to photograph” – you’ll have to assess whether or not you want to take the risks involved. If you have any questions, feel free to drop me an e-mail.

  24. Sara Harpley says:

    How desperately sad that that someone’s personal effects are just left for the voyeuristic… surely there must be family or an estate that can look after and treasure all these things. I’m guessing from the date the owner has died? Did the villagers give you any information or do you know anything about the owner?

    We had an abandoned house in our family, due to environmental causes rather that personal circumstances; but I think all the possessions were moved out? We visited recently and took some slate stone away to put on my Nan’s grave as it was historically her family home. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keld,_North_Yorkshire ‘Crackpot Hall’

    • The Urban Explorer says:

      Yeah it is sad, but fascinating for people like me!

      Just read about Crackpot Hall, what a great place to have in your family history. And it looks like it’s in a lovely spot too! Amazing!

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